Daegu Chicken and Beer Festival 대구 치맥 페스티벌

There are countless festivals for every season in Korea, but some of them stand out more than others. When I first heard that there was a chicken and beer festival I knew I had to go! We only live an hour by train from Daegu so we decided to make the trek and meet up with a few friends that we don’t get to see very often! Actually this video is what sold me on going. They even had a theme song and dance! How can you resist a summer day with cold beer, fried chicken, and silly dances?!

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Say What?! Episode 3: Hot Soup in Summer?

This week’s Say What?! Wednesday is about how weather and food are related in Korea. Koreans are very proud that they have 4 distinct seasons, but there are a few other “mini-seasons” in Korea that are worth noting! I mention several korean words in the video, and I’ll try to explain them clearly here.

In this video I talk about 복날 (Boknal), a month long weather pattern indicating the hottest part of the summer. There are 3 special days during 복날 (Boknal), the first is 초복 (Cho-bok), then 중복(Joong-bok), and 말복 (Mal-bok). As I mentioned in the video, this past Saturday (7/13) was 초복 Cho-bok!

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Exploring Igidae Park in Busan

This weekend we had some plans that fell through. Suddenly it was mid-afternoon on a Saturday, and it was surprisingly nice weather for rainy season. We decided to quickly leave while the sun was still out, and we made our way to the opposite end of Busan by subway.

Heading to Igidae!

Living outside of the city means there’s still a lot we haven’t seen. Since winter ended, we’ve been trying to change that! It is pretty far away from Yangsan, about an hour on Line 2. From there I’d say we walked about 30 minutes to the start of the trail, but we meandered a bit to enjoy the views and take photos. Here’s the map we found online!



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Evan’s Hagwon Tour

Hello again! It’s time for another video!

I (Evan) work at a rather large hagwon in our little city in South Korea. It’s a big, four story building with many large and small class rooms. There’s even a huge, nice apartment on top. The hagwon sits half way up Obongsan, so there are great views from the roof and the windows on the upper floors. It’s across from a public kindergarten, named 해바라기, where I also teach – but that’s a story for another post!

Hagwon in Korea

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Say What?! Episode 2: That’s a Holiday?

Happy Say What?! Wednesday! ^^

Episode 2 in our series highlights national holidays or “Red Days”. Usually when I see job ads for teaching positions online it vaguely says “All national holidays off”. Most people reading the job ad at first glance wouldn’t think twice about that, because it seems standard and straightforward. While the details on national holidays and other random days you get off of work may not be the most important information in the world, it’s something fun to know ahead of time! (Although some teachers may enjoy the surprise days off! I assure you those will still exist. hehe!)

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Stories from Korea Ep. 1: Lost and Found

This month marks 3 years of living in Korea. I cant believe how quickly the years have gone by! When I think in years, it doesn’t seem like that much time has actually passed. When I think of my first day in Korea–arriving in Seoul around 5am on a Saturday, people still partying from the night before outside of my officetel, not knowing a word of korean, grabbing the only thing that seemed familiar to eat(cup ramyeon)–all of that seems like forever ago. So much has happened since then, and I’m so glad we have our videos to look back on and remember the things we’ve experienced in Korea.

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Say What?! Episode 1: Students can’t fail?

There are so many surprises, good and bad, that expats experience whilst living and working abroad. Moving to Korea to teach is a big step, and not something to be taken lightly. Korea is very different from most of our home countries, and it’s important that before you make the decision to come live and work in Korea, you have your expectations set at a reasonable place, that you don’t come expecting it be like America (insert your home country), and that you are flexible, open-minded, and slow to judgement. I think these are the keys to happiness not just in Korea, but any country you choose to reside.

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