The Troubling English Obsession in South Korea: How Foreign ESL Teachers Can Be Part of the Solution

As of 2013, there are thought to be nearly 20,000 first-language English speakers working for public schools and privately owned language programs (hagwons) in South Korea.  Korean parents regularly shell out as much as a third of their household income to get their children in an after school program with these foreign instructors.  As a result, hagwon profits have soared, surpassing US$7 billion in 2009.

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Best Link’s of the Week – February 2nd Edition

These are some of the best reads I found about Korea over the last week.  I hope everyone has a great weekend!  If you’re partying, enjoy the much improved weather.  If you’re an introvert like me, enjoy chillin’ at your home doing whatever it is that us introverts like to do!  If you found any other great articles this week, please add them in the comment section.

Koreabang– Park Geun Hye is getting married – If you thought Mitt Romney or Barrack Obama were scary, get a load of the creepy wedding invitations.

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Kimchibytes Welcomes Andy Baxley

On the web, Kimchibytes grew considerably since November.  Even in person, it’s strange to go out because if one person mentions Kimchibytes, it’s not uncommon for someone else in the group to actually know about this blog.  The responses encourage me and I would like to thank everyone who supports this blog- especially those who follow Kimchibytes by e-mail or on WordPress. As a teacher, however, it’s hard to find time to take great pictures and write articles that people will read.  I spend a considerable amount of time working on this blog and that’s why it’s had some success.

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Korean Hanbok vs Japanese Kimono – Epic Dress Battles of History

Hanbok Post-3

What is a Hanbok? 

 A hanbok is a traditional Korean dress.  Throughout Korean history, commoners wore the hanbok and it became popularized during the celebrated Joseon Dynasty.  Interestingly, the hanbok was adopted from nomadic cultures in northern Asia, so its style is drastically different from the formal wear adopted by agricultural cultures like China.    Although the style of the hanbok evolved over time, Koreans still wear the hanbok for formal or semi-formal events like festivals, celebrations, special family events, weddings or first birthdays.

 What is a Kimono?

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