Destination: Han River Cruise

:

It’s a little embarrassing, but after two-plus years there are still quite a few ‘touristy’ things around Seoul and Korea I’ve yet to see. For some there’s a plausible reason (no plans on the seeing the DMZ the way tensions are right now) while I just hadn’t gotten around to others. That had been my excuse for not trying a Han river cruise – the sort that leave from Yeouido or Jamsil. The Lady in Red was up for the trip, so off we went.

It’s a little embarrassing, but after two-plus years there are still quite a few ‘touristy’ things around Seoul and Korea I’ve yet to see. For some there’s a plausible reason (no plans on the seeing the DMZ the way tensions are right now) while I just hadn’t gotten around to others. That had been my excuse for not trying a Han river cruise – the sort that leave from Yeouido or Jamsil. The Lady in Red was up for the trip, so off we went.

The cruise schedule changes pretty often, so I can’t make any guarantees on how long the schedule stays thus. As of this posting, seven ships a day make the round trip from Jamsil Wharf back to Jamsil Wharf (11:30am, 1:30pm, 3:30pm, 4:30pm, 6:30pm, 7:30pm, and 9:20pm; 11,000 won for a sixty-minute ride), while four make the one-way trip to Yeouido’s Wharf (10:10am, 1pm, 2:30pm, and 6pm; 13,000 won for a seventy-minute ride).


We had some time to kill, so we got some fried chicken at one of the restaurants inside the permanently-docked boat. It doesn’t rock, but you can still tell you’re on water. A couple other food options exist if you want to make it a ‘dinner and a cruise’ sort of date.

The signs of wear and tear are present, but not a huge deal.


One of several bridges you’ll go under along the way. An audio announcement plays some information about each bridge in both Korean and English, but you’ll need to be standing in just the right spot to make sense of it. Think 1980’s ballpark.

The bridges were probably the highlight, especially if you appreciate large, complex man-made structures. If not, the water will lap up waves, and there’s more than enough apartment buildings to gaze at.

In all, it was a bit disappointing – beyond being ‘touristy’, the night lights of Seoul are made up of tall apartment buildings and bridges – hardly an escape. The facilities are decent enough, if somewhat faded or worn. It might be nice to see a few nighttime sights as a tourist strapped for time, but enjoying the river is just as easily done without being taken for a ride.

Ratings (out of 5 taeguks):
Ease to arrive:

Foreigner-friendly:

Convenience facilities:

Worth the visit:

Share Delicious Bookmark this on Delicious

Directions to Jamsil Wharf (잠실 선착장): Take line 2 of the Seoul subway system to the Sincheon station (NOT Jamsil station, and NOT Sinchon station). Take exit 7 to street level, then walk to the first main road you see. Cross the street and turn left, keeping your eyes out for the river and port on your right.

Creative Commons License © Chris Backe – 2010

This post was originally published on my blog, Chris in South Korea. If you are reading this on another website and there is no linkback or credit given, you are reading an UNAUTHORIZED FEED.




Leave a Comment