Destination: Time to Rock Festival (2010)

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The 2010 Time to Rock Festival offered music-lovers more metal and rock than the city has heard in a long time. The same location as the recent World DJ Festival, the Nanji Han River Camping area was again filled with thousands of people ready to get their rock on. There were several noticeable differences in the crowd, however – the bill was filled with Korean bands, and there were far fewer foreigners present than at the DJ Festival. I couldn’t tell you whether those two are correlated or not, but Korean and foreigner alike had a tough time understanding vocals.

The 2010 Time to Rock Festival offered music-lovers more metal and rock than the city has heard in a long time. The same location as the recent World DJ Festival, the Nanji Han River Camping area was again filled with thousands of people ready to get their rock on. There were several noticeable differences in the crowd, however – the bill was filled with Korean bands, and there were far fewer foreigners present than at the DJ Festival. I couldn’t tell you whether those two are correlated or not, but Korean and foreigner alike had a tough time understanding vocals.

Two stages offered differing styles of music – where the main (Nokia) stage offered up the louder or metal bands, the tent (Jager) stage offered up more of a pop sound.

Daybreak – the band’s bassist, at least.

Daybreak’s lead singer.

Since most of the bands were Korean (and all the announcements I heard were in Korean), it’s a little difficult to follow which band was on which stage. I’m pretty sure this was 내귀에 도청장치.

While raucous, the crowd was pretty well-contained – not pictured is the lone security guy in the middle of it all.


Loudness – the bassist and lead singer, respectively. They were probably the loudest (and most well received) band we saw all night.

The crowd, while significantly smaller than the DJ Festival, still numbered in the thousands – and kept rocking long after the sun went down. I had no complaints about the festival – well-organized, plenty of food and drink, plenty of good company with the Groove editors (those pictures will not be published to protect people’s reputations and good names… LOL), and of course plenty of music.

Ratings (out of 5 taeguks):
Ease to arrive:

Foreigner-friendly:

Convenience facilities:

Worth the visit:

Disclosure: Chris in South Korea received two free passes to the event from the Groove Magazine.

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