Destination: Wolgok Land (jimjilbang)

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Author’s note: this is the 2nd in a series of jimjilbang (day spas or saunas) worth visiting in Korea.

Wolgok Land (월곡건강랜드) – Don’t knock a place just because it’s far off the tourist track. With modern facilities, plenty of room, and some English signage, this place wins the ‘most variety’ award. In addition to the plentiful saunas and multiple ice rooms, there’s a salt room to lay down in, a phytoncide room (산림욕방, or a slightly humid room) and a Loess oxygen room to breathe deeply in.


Author’s note: this is the 2nd in a series of jimjilbang (day spas or saunas) worth visiting in Korea.

Wolgok Land (월곡건강랜드) – Don’t knock a place just because it’s far off the tourist track. With modern facilities, plenty of room, and some English signage, this place wins the ‘most variety’ award. In addition to the plentiful saunas and multiple ice rooms, there’s a salt room to lay down in, a phytoncide room (산림욕방, or a slightly humid room) and a Loess oxygen room to breathe deeply in.

If you prefer just laying on the floor to relax, there’s ample room for that. Get started with a cold bath, a warm hinoki-style bath, a warm massage bath, and three ‘wet’ saunas. Since it’s off the beaten path, you’re unlikely to see other foreigners – except the ones you came with, of course.

If you’re looking to take the heat, this room rocks. It’s actually a salt room (소금찜질방), with bag of salt crystals for ‘pillows’. Head up to the fourth floor for this and some good massage chairs.

Go up to the fifth floor for cave-like sleeping rooms (separated for men and women) and a large fitness center (extra fee). One of the ice rooms is also up here. Put simply, there’s enough here to keep you busy an entire afternoon or evening. Open 24 hours, 7,000 won standard admission.

Wolgok station, line 6, exit 2. Walk about 50 meters, then turn right down the first alley you see. Walk another 100 meters then bear left. Follow the parking lot on your right until you see an opening to the front entrance. If coming at night, you’ll see the building’s neon from the alley.

Ratings (out of 5 taeguks):

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