REFLECTIONS: Instrumental vs organic view of progress

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I think the thing that I need to remember the most is that “the world is open to endless possibilities and I shouldn’t falsely believe that I am locked into taking a shrinking range of possibilities, locked out of some for false reasons such as fear, bias, or force of habit.”
It’s nice to be able to just let go and do whatever comes around. It’s one of the biggest predictors of good luck, extroversion, creativity, innovation and adaptability.
There is freedom in the world, and that is what excites me – the possibilities (and thus future adventures) are endless.

I think the thing that I need to remember the most is that “the world is open to endless possibilities and I shouldn’t falsely believe that I am locked into taking a shrinking range of possibilities, locked out of some for false reasons such as fear, bias, or force of habit.”
It’s nice to be able to just let go and do whatever comes around. It’s one of the biggest predictors of good luck, extroversion, creativity, innovation and adaptability.
There is freedom in the world, and that is what excites me – the possibilities (and thus future adventures) are endless.

Another take on this, is the instrumental view of progress or the organic view of progress.

In an instrumental view of progress, you assume that you know how to predict the future using such variables as education qualifications, experience, money or past behavior/patterns; which is never entirely true (read: The Black Swan). Pretty much humans are unable to predict the future (even the best economist advisors only get predictions 47% of the time (read: Think like a Freak, chapter 2)).

In an organic view of progress, you look onto the world with no a prior assumptions or built-up theories and thus just see what is. By looking merely what exists with no biased-inducing glasses, we are able the full extent of possibilities that exist; rather than merely restricting the choices we ourselves take according to our own personal beliefs, biases, fears and personal theories of how the work ‘should’ work.

In taking an instrumental view, you first build up the theories of knowledge of how you think things should work; dedicating your waking hours in search of data and literature to validate your already biased interpretation of the world. Thus, giving yourself prescriptions of behavior (as you believe these actions will get you where you want to; read: it won’t) where any deviations are not allowed and thus sucks out all or any of the life and energy from your daily life (read: sucks any possibility of chance/luck and thus newness and creativity from your life).

In taking an organic view of progress, you are merely taking things as they go. Not giving up (read: not taking a fate-bound thinking), i.e. not believing that any action you do has no effect on future consequences. But actually looking at the world as it is without bias or fear, and choosing the path (and thus the actions) that open up possibilities, or present something new, or present something interesting, or gives you room to grow, or provides a new challenge to you; or maybe we don’t even choose. Maybe in order to introduce luck, and therefore growth (read: black swan; the art of luck), we should attempt a systematic intervention, for example, before going to a networking event you choose a color, and talk only to the people who are wearing that color. In this sense, even though you yourself have decided the color that decides who you talk to (even if by chance you decided on that color) it has changed and impacted your standard biases that relate to fear, cultural and experiential biases. That is one intervention, that kills the thinking (&cutting away the possibilities in front of you), and opens up new chances, new possibilities and thus new growth. Without the chance/luck there is no fun. And even though it goes against your perceived thinking that if I do/get x, then I can attain y (which is inherently false), it has a greater chance of producing more future returns (i.e. growth and success) then the instrumental view of progress.



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