The Subject was Sandwiches

:
 NOT ACTUAL SIZE
Hot Roast beef on rye, with melted sharp cheddar, thinly sliced purple onions and steak tomatoes with crushed black pepper, spicy mustard
and sour dill pickles, all courtesy of Junior’s Famous Deli and my ingenuity              HUNGRY YET?

A decade ago, when I lived in Seoul and worked for Konkuk University, circa 1999-2001, I was paid 75,000 won (about 70 dollars) to write a story for Konkuk’s English Language Magazine.  I recently found that magazine’s issue with my story, on my brother’s shelf.   

 NOT ACTUAL SIZE
Hot Roast beef on rye, with melted sharp cheddar, thinly sliced purple onions and steak tomatoes with crushed black pepper, spicy mustard
and sour dill pickles, all courtesy of Junior’s Famous Deli and my ingenuity              HUNGRY YET?

A decade ago, when I lived in Seoul and worked for Konkuk University, circa 1999-2001, I was paid 75,000 won (about 70 dollars) to write a story for Konkuk’s English Language Magazine.  I recently found that magazine’s issue with my story, on my brother’s shelf.   

The Subject of my essay was Sandwhiches, and the varieties of them that we have in America.  I state, that unlike Asians who can and do eat rice EVERYDAY, the only food that I could eat everyday is sandwhiches:  hot, cold, toasted; with or without meat/cheese/veggies; on a roll, on a bun, on varieties of sliced bread.

I missed good sandwiches so much during the decade I lived in Asia.  Definitely, after my family/friends AND Manny Mota, I would have to list YUMMY SANDWICHES as the number one thing I missed of all things American, during my extended stay in the Orient.

And yes, my heading The Subject was Sandwhiches is making reference to the play/movie The Subject was Roses


 

The film version of The Subject of Roses debuted in 1968, the year of my birth.  Martin Sheen played the young, idealistic 20 something young man, both in the film, AND on Broadway the year before.  When I saw The Subject was Roses on the Music Center’s dramatic stage in February 2010, Martin Sheen played the old world, Depression Age Americanco Father.

Things change, but Sandwiches remain delicious, scrumptious, TIMELESS!
   



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